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Points Principles: Can I Transfer Airline Miles to Someone Else?

best airline loyalty program

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Editor’s Note: Welcome to our Points Principles series, an ongoing series dedicated to explaining the basics behind the confusing world of frequent flyer miles and travel rewards points. Follow along as we lay out some of the building blocks to travel for nearly free. And check back to the Points Principles page to see what ground we’ve already covered.

 

Even new travelers just getting started with points and miles quickly confront a complicated question: Can you transfer or combine miles with a spouse, friend, relative, or companion?

It would no doubt be helpful. Maybe you’re just a few thousand points short of making an award booking and your spouse or significant other has the miles you need. Is it even possible?

In general, yes. But that doesn’t mean you should. 

Most airlines will charge you an arm and a leg to transfer your hard-earned miles to another traveler. With one notable exception, it makes transferring miles on most major too expensive to be worth it.

Here’s how each of the major domestic airlines handles transferring miles to another account.

 

Transferring Delta SkyMiles

While you can transfer miles between two different Delta SkyMiles accounts, it’s not a good idea. That’s because Delta will charge you $0.01 per mile plus a $30 processing fee per transaction (plus applicable taxes). And you must transfer miles in allotments of 1,000 SkyMiles.

 

transfer airline miles Delta

 

That means if you were looking to transfer 30,000 SkyMiles to another user, it would cost you $330 ($300 for the miles and a $30 transaction fee). With costs that high, I can’t think of a situation where this would make financial sense. Just avoid these transfers.

You can transfer a maximum of 30,000 SkyMiles per transaction. Within a calendar year, one SkyMiles account can transfer a maximum of 150,000 SkyMiles. One SkyMiles member can receive a maximum of 300,000 SkyMiles each year via transfer.

You can learn more about this on Delta’s mileage transfer FAQ page.

 

Transferring American AAdvantage Miles 

Like Delta, American allows users to transfer their miles to other accounts but it comes at a huge cost – so we don’t recommend it. American will charge you $12.50 for every 1,000 miles you transfer plus a $15 processing fee per transaction (plus applicable taxes).

 

transfer airline miles american

 

That means if you were looking to transfer 30,000 American AAdvantage miles to another user, it would cost you $390 ($375 for the miles and a $15 processing fee). Save your money and don’t do it.

Each AAdvantage member is limited to receiving no more than 200,000 AAdvantage miles and may transfer no more than 200,000 AAdvantage miles out of their AAdvantage account in a calendar year.

You can learn more about this on American’s mileage transfer Terms & Conditions page.

 

Transferring United MileagePlus Miles

You may be recognizing a trend.

Like Delta and American, United allows users to transfer their miles to others but again, it comes at a huge cost. United will charge you $7.50 for every 500 miles you transfer plus a $30 processing fee per transaction (plus applicable taxes).

 

transfer airline miles united

 

That means if you were looking to transfer 30,000 United MileagePlus miles to another user, it would cost you $480 ($450 for the miles and a $30 processing fee). Again, save your money and don’t do it.

MileagePlus miles can be transferred in 500-mile increments between 500 and 5,000 miles, and in 1,000-mile increments from 5,000 to 100,000 miles.

You can transfer up to 100,000 miles to each recipient’s account per calendar year, and you can’t receive more than 100,000 miles from any other MileagePlus account or combination of account in any calendar year.

By the numbers, United is by far the worst offender when it comes to charging for mileage transfers among the big three domestic airlines.

You can learn more about this on United’s mileage transfer Terms & Conditions page.

 

Transferring Southwest Rapid Rewards Points

Southwest Airlines charges $0.01 center per Rapid Rewards point you are looking to transfer. Rapid Rewards Points can be transferred in blocks of 1,000 during promotional periods (and 500 points at all other times) with a minimum transfer amount of 2,000 points and a daily maximum of 60,000 points.

 

transfer airline miles southwest

 

Using our 30,000-point example, it would cost you $300 to transfer 30,000 Rapid Rewards Points. It doesn’t appear Southwest charges a processing fee to complete a transfer – but this is still a bad deal and generally shouldn’t be considered.

You can learn more about this on Southwest’s mileage transfer Terms & Conditions page.

 

Transferring Alaska Mileage Plan Miles

You can transfer Alaska Airlines Mileage Plan miles to the account of a friend or family member, but once again it will cost you.

You can transfer 1,000 to 30,000 miles in increments of 1,000 miles at a cost of $10.00 per 1,000 miles, plus a $25.00 processing fee per transaction.

Additionally, Alaska allows you to transfer 100,000 miles in to or out of an account per calendar year.

 

 

That means if you were looking to transfer 30,000 Alaska Mileage Plan miles to another user, it would cost you $325 ($300 for the miles and a $30 processing fee). Again, save your money; don’t do it.

 

Transferring JetBlue TrueBlue Miles

When it comes to domestic airlines offering transfers between two accounts, no airline does it better than JetBlue.

Last year, they expanded their points pooling feature, and now allow pools of up to seven friends, family members or even complete strangers that you can share your points with. The best part? There is no cost to operate one of these pools.

 

 

You can add up to seven total members of a pool, no matter whether they’re family or friends. The “Pool Leader” can decide which members can use pooled miles to book reward flights. And it’s worth noting that 100% of pool members’ miles earned are added to the pool account.

With that, some other important aspects to keep in mind:

  • TrueBlue members can only be part of one pool.
  • Pool leaders must be 21 or older.
  • Pool leaders can remove members and designate which members can use pooled miles.
  • Members can leave a pool at any time, taking unused miles with them.

Read more about jetBlue’s points pooling feature on their website.

 

Our Analysis

While airlines allow you to transfer your miles to other accounts, rarely is it a good idea. The fees are exorbitant and will wipe out any potential savings you would realize from using the miles in the first place.

And if both accounts have enough to book tickets separately, there is no reason to transfer and combine them. You can book the tickets from each account and choose seats next to each other. Or better yet, if you have enough miles in your account, you can book a ticket for another person directly from your account. There is no requirement that your miles be used for booking only your tickets.

You can then contact the airline via Twitter or phone and let them know you are traveling together, should anything happen to your itineraries.

 

Bottom Line

Don’t plan to transfer airline miles to another account. It’s expensive and usually not a good idea. Any money you might save by using miles will be given back to the airline in the form of transfer fees.

 

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Editorial Note: Any opinions, analyses, reviews, or recommendations expressed in this article are those of the author’s alone, and have not been reviewed, approved, or otherwise endorsed by any card issuer.

4 Responses

  1. HarlandJ says:

    Not being able to transfer miles raises a minor dilemma — my wife and I each have over 80k miles that we would like to use for a joint overseas trip — would you prefer each booking a roundtrip, or each booking two one-ways?

    • Nick Serati says:

      You can book each ticket out of each account and then contact the airline to let them know you’re traveling together should anything happen to your itinerary. This is the easiest way and avoids having to transfer miles.

  2. Elizabeth Sinner says:

    Although it costs money to transfer miles, how does it work if I book my granddaughter on a flight with my miles. Is that the same?

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