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What the Delta Medallion Status Changes Mean for Flyers, SkyMiles Cardholders

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Delta recently announced huge changes coming to its SkyMiles Medallion program and plans to drastically limit access to the Delta Sky Club lounges for travelers with a co-branded Delta SkyMiles American Express credit card in their wallet.

As is often the case with large-scale changes like the ones Delta pulled back the curtain on this week, it has left many travelers confused about what this actually means and how they will be impacted.

The answer to that question largely depends on your elite status with Delta, whether or not you plan to requalify for Medallion elite status, and what Delta SkyMiles credit card you have in your wallet.

Read on for our analysis of these changes and how they might impact you starting early next year.

 

Delta SkyMiles Medallion Status Program Changes

As it stands today, there are three building blocks to earning Delta status:

  • Medallion Qualification Miles (MQMs): a measure of how many miles you've flown with Delta,
  • Medallion Qualification Segments (MQSs): a measure of how many flight segments you've taken with Delta
  • Medallion Qualification Dollars (MQDs): a measure of how much money you've spent with Delta or Delta partner airlines.

Outside of qualifying for Delta status, MQMs, MQSs, and MQDs have no value and can not be redeemed for flights like Delta SkyMiles can.

You need to earn a certain amount of either MQMs or MQSs as well as a certain number of MQDs to qualify for every level of Delta status from Silver to Diamond Medallion.

 

delta medallion status tiers

 

However, if you hold either the *delta skymiles platinum card* or the *delta reserve card* you can get an MQD waiver to satisfy the MQD requirement for earning status by spending at least $25,000 on your card in a calendar year.

That waiver is enough to satisfy the MQD requirement for Silver, Gold, and Platinum status. To get an MQD waiver for Diamond status, you need to spend a whopping $250,000 on your card in a calendar year.

That's all changing starting on Jan. 1, 2024, as Delta flyers begin working towards requalifying for Medallion status for the 2025 year.

The biggest change? Delta flyers will earn only MQDs, and will no longer earn Medallion Qualifying Miles (MQMs) or Medallion Qualifying Segments (MQSs).

That said, Delta is giving flyers more ways to actually earn MQDs beyond just spending on Delta and its partner airlines.

 

How to Earn Delta MQDs Starting in 2024

  • You'll earn 1 MQD per $1 spent on the ticket price for a Delta-marketed flight operated by Delta or a Delta partner airline.
  • If you hold the *delta reserve card* or the *delta reserve biz card*, you'll earn 1 MQD for every $10 you spend.
  • If you hold the *delta skymiles platinum card*, or the *delta platinum biz card*, you'll earn 1 MQD for every $20 you spend.
  • You'll earn 1 MQD per $1 spent on completed car rentals booked through Delta.
  • You'll earn 1 MQD per $1 spent on completed hotel stays booked through Delta.
  • You'll earn 1 MQD per $1 spent on Delta Vacations package bookings.
  • There will no longer be an MQD waiver for meeting a spending threshold on the Delta Platinum and Reserve credit cards.
  • There will be no path to earning MQDs for spending on the *delta skymiles gold card*.

 

How Many MQDs Will You Need to Earn to Qualify for Delta Medallion Status?

While Delta will soon be providing more ways to actually earn MQDs, they're also moving the goalposts in terms of how many of them you need to earn to qualify for Medallion status. And without the option for an MQD waiver by spending either $25,000 or $250,000 on your Delta Platinum or Reserve Amex card in a calendar year, it's going to get harder to satisfy those requirements.

Here's a look at those changes:

 

Medallion Tiers 2023 MQD Thresholds2024 MQD Thresholds
Silver3,000 MQDs5,000 MQDs
Gold8,000 MQDs10,000 MQDs
Platinum12,000 MQDs15,000 MQDs
Diamond20,000 MQDs28,000 MQDs

 

So what does this mean if you want to requalify for Delta status? We've broken it down for each level of status below.

 

MQD Spending Requirements for Each Status Level

Don't Have Status? Don't Worry

If you don't have any level of Delta Medallion status or don't plan on trying to qualify for status starting in the new year, you need not worry. These changes are not going to impact you.

There are no changes to how you'll actually earn SkyMiles – the redeemable miles you can use towards a flight purchase with Delta – by flying with the airline or spending on a Delta American Express credit card.

We've spilled a lot of digital ink about the sad state of the Delta SkyMiles in 2023, but in terms of these recent changes, it's all about the chase for elite status and non-status holders shouldn't be impacted.

 

What You'll Need to Requalify for Silver Medallion Status in 2024

With MQMs and MQSs no longer a metric that helps you qualify for Delta status starting next year, it's all about the chase for MQDs. Currently, you need to earn 3,000 MQDs to satisfy the Silver Medallion status requirement (along with 25,000 MQMs).

Next year, the MQM threshold goes away and you'll need to earn 6,000 MQDs to get status for 2025 – doubling the requirement. That means if you were already satisfying the 3,000 MQD requirement without the MQD waiver from a Delta card, essentially spending $3,000 each year with Delta or Delta partner airlines, you'll need to find a way to earn 3,000 more.

Under the new rules, you can earn the necessary MQDs through a number of different combinations of spending. Here's what that looks like in terms of only additional credit card spending. For 3,000 more MQDs, you'd need to spend a total of $30,000 on your Delta Reserve card. If you have a Platinum card, that total grows to $60,000.

Assuming you didn't have any spending with Delta, here's what you'd need to spend with each card to meet the MQD threshold.

 

Status Level2023 MQDs2024 MQDsDelta Reserve SpendDelta Platinum Spend
Silver3,0006,000$60,000$120,000

 

If you weren't already hitting the MQD status threshold and were instead relying on the waiver for spending $25,000 on your Delta credit card, you'll obviously need to spend more than what is laid out above on your Delta card to get to the new MQD requirement.

But remember: This is just one example of how much you'd need to spend and in what way to earn Delta status under the new rules. There are any number of ways you could hit those MQD minimums.

 

What You Get With Delta Silver Medallion Status

  • Access to preferred seats at the time of booking
  • Access to Delta Comfort Plus seats 24 hours prior to flight, based on availability
  • Complimentary upgrades to all other fares based on availability one day in advance of departure
  • Waived baggage fees
  • SkyMiles mileage bonus (2 additional miles per dollar spent with Delta)

 

What You'll Need to Requalify for Gold Medallion in 2024

As it stands today, you need to earn 8,000 MQDs to satisfy the Gold Medallion status requirement (along with 50,000 MQMs).

Next year, the MQM threshold goes away and you'll need to earn 12,000 MQDs – 33% more. That means if you were already satisfying the 8,000 MQD requirement without the MQD waiver from an Amex credit card – essentially spending $8,000 each year with Delta or Delta partner airlines, you'll need to find a way to earn 4,000 more MQDs.

Here's what that looks like in terms of additional credit card spending. For 4,000 more MQDs, you'd need to spend a total of $40,000 on your Delta Reserve card. If you have a Platinum card, that total grows to $80,000.

Assuming you didn't have any spending with Delta, here's what you'd need to spend with each card to meet the MQD threshold.

 

Status Level2023 MQDs2024 MQDsDelta Reserve SpendDelta Platinum Spend
Gold8,00012,000$120,000$240,000

 

If you weren't already hitting the MQD status threshold and were instead relying on the waiver for spending $25,000 on your Delta credit card, you'll need to spend more than what is laid out above on your Delta card to get to the new MQD requirement.

 

What You Get With Delta Gold Medallion Status

  • Access to preferred seats at the time of booking
  • Access to Delta Comfort Plus seats 72 hours prior to flight – based on availability
  • Complimentary upgrades to all other fares based on availability three days in advance
  • Sky Priority Boarding and baggage handling, Priority Security Line Access
  • Waived baggage, same-day changes, standby, and other fees
  • SkyMiles mileage bonus (3 additional miles per dollar spent with Delta)

 

What You'll Need to Requalify for Platinum Medallion in 2024

As it stands today, you need to earn 12,000 MQDs to satisfy the Platinum Medallion status requirement (along with 75,000 MQMs).

Next year, the MQM threshold goes away and you'll need to earn 18,000 MQDs – 33% more. That means if you were already satisfying the 12,000 MQD requirement without the MQD waiver from an Amex credit card – essentially spending $12,000 each year with Delta or Delta partner airlines, you'll need to find a way to earn 6,000 more.

Here's what that looks like in terms of additional credit card spending. For 6,000 more MQDs, you'd need to spend a total of $60,000 on your Delta Reserve card. If you have a Platinum card, that total grows to $120,000.

Assuming you didn't have any spending with Delta, here's what you'd need to spend with each card to meet the MQD threshold.

 

Status Level2023 MQDs2024 MQDsDelta Reserve SpendDelta Platinum Spend
Platinum12,00018,000$180,000$360,000

 

If you weren't already hitting the MQD status threshold for Platinum status (it's likely many Platinums were not), and were instead relying on the waiver for spending $25,000 on your Delta credit card, you'll need to spend more than what is laid out above, and vastly more than what you previously needed for the waiver requirement on your Delta card to get to the new MQD requirement.

 

What You Get With Delta Platinum Medallion Status

  • Access to one Delta Choice benefit each year
  • Access to Delta Comfort Plus seats at the time of purchase
  • Complimentary upgrades to all other fares based on availability five days in advance
  • Sky Priority Boarding and baggage handling, Priority Security Line Access
  • Waived baggage, same-day changes, standby, and other fees
  • SkyMiles mileage bonus (4 additional miles per dollar spent with Delta)

 

What You'll Need to Requalify for Diamond Medallion in 2024

As it stands today, you need to earn 20,000 MQDs to satisfy the Platinum Medallion status requirement (along with 125,000 MQMs).

Next year, the MQM threshold goes away and you'll need to earn 35,000 MQDs – 43% more. That means if you were already satisfying the 20,000 MQD requirement – essentially spending $20,000 each year with Delta or Delta partner airlines, you'll need to find a way to earn 15,000 more.

Here's what that looks like in terms of additional credit card spending. For 15,000 more MQDs, you'd need to spend a total of $150,000 on your Delta Reserve card. If you have a Platinum card, that total grows to a whopping $300,000.

Assuming you didn't have any spending with Delta, here's what you'd need to spend with each card to meet the MQD threshold.

 

Status Level2023 MQDs2024 MQDsDelta Reserve SpendDelta Platinum Spend
Diamond20,00035,000$350,000$700,000

 

If you weren't already hitting the MQD status threshold for Diamond status and were instead relying on the waiver for spending $250,000 on your Delta credit card, you'll need to spend more than what is laid out above, and likely that number will be vastly more than what you previously needed for the waiver requirement on your Delta card to get to the new MQD requirement.

Again, these are just a few examples of how much you'd need to spend and in what way to earn the different levels of Delta status under the new rules. There are any number of ways you could hit those MQD minimums.

 

What You Get With Delta Diamond Medallion Status

  • Access to three Delta Choice benefits each year
  • Access to Delta Comfort Plus seats at purchase
  • Complimentary upgrades to all other fare classes based on availability five days in advance
  • Premium Boarding and baggage handling, Priority Security Line Access
  • Waived baggage, same-day changes, standby, and other fees
  • SkyMiles mileage bonus (6 additional miles per dollar)

 

Delta Medallion Program Change Takeaways

No matter how you slice and dice it, this stings. Status is going to get much harder to earn next year and it is going to require a lot more spending with Delta, on your Amex Delta credit card, or some combination of both.

After extending status throughout the pandemic, too many flyers have Delta status right now and that is exactly what Delta is trying to fix with these program updates. As the saying goes, “When everybody has status, nobody has status.”

It's clear from these changes that Delta cares more about how much you spend with the airline and on your Delta credit card than they do about how much you actually fly with them. Those are the travelers who are going to be rewarded with Delta Medallion status.

 

delta a321neo first class

 

The new program rules technically allow you to spend your way to Delta status without setting foot on a Delta plane. But spending your way to status is going to require a comical amount of spending and it just won't make sense for the vast majority of travelers. Case in point: To earn Delta Platinum status without flying would require spending $180,000 a year on a Delta Reserve card.

Also, if you want to qualify for Medallion status, Delta is really forcing your hand to get the *delta reserve card*. It makes your spending twice as valuable as opposed to carrying the Platinum card which can go a long way when looking at the amount of spending that will be required.

 

Have a Ton of Roll Over MQMs? Here are Your Options

For years, Delta has allowed SkyMiles members to roll over any MQMs that were above and beyond the highest level of status they had achieved. So for example, if you earned 60,000 MQMs – enough for Gold status – and also met the MQD requirement, you could roll over 10,000 MQMs towards achieving status for the following year.

With the program changes and MQMs no longer being a metric to earn status, that option is going away.

But starting with the new Medallion year on Jan. 1, 2024, travelers with rollover MQMs from 2023 for the 2024 Medallion year will be able to convert those MQMs into MQDs or into SkyMiles.

  • If you want to turn those existing MQMs into SkyMiles you'll be able to do so at a rate of 2:1. Meaning 200,000 rollover MQMs would get you 100,000 SkyMiles.
  • Converting MQMs into MQDs can be done at an abysmal rate of 20:1. Those same 200,000 MQMs would get you 10,000 MQDs. That isn't even enough to earn Gold status with the new requirements.

If you want to do some combination of both when you covert these, Delta will allow you to do so in the following amounts:

  • 100% redeemable SkyMiles, 0% MQDs.
  • 75% redeemable SkyMiles, 25% MQDs.
  • 50% redeemable SkyMiles, 50% MQDs.
  • 25% redeemable SkyMiles, 75% MQDs.
  • 0% redeemable SkyMiles, 100% MQDs.

 

Delta SkyMiles Credit Card Changes

Earning status with Delta isn't the only thing that took a big hit yesterday. There are some big changes to the suite of Delta SkyMiles credit cards that you'll want to be aware of as well.

Here's what's in store.

 

Have the SkyMiles Gold Card? Don't Fret

If you have the Delta SkyMiles Gold card, these changes to earning status aren't going to impact you. As it stands today, Delta SkyMiles Gold cardholders don't have the ability to earn an MQD waiver for spending. If you want help with the chase for status, you'll need at least the Delta Platinum or Delta Reserve card.

 

delta amex gold card

 

That's not changing. Spending you do on your Delta Gold card won't earn MQDs towards building status. Additionally, Gold cardholders currently don't have a path into the Delta Sky Club.

This card is all about the free checked bag you'll get when you fly with Delta and the welcome offer bonus miles you'll get when you first open the card. And neither of those perks are impacted by this latest round of changes.

 

SkyMiles Platinum Cardholders Will Lose Lounge Access

SkyMiles Platinum cardholders will take a big hit next year. Starting on Jan. 1, 2024, Platinum cardholders will no longer be able to buy their way into the Delta Sky Club.

Currently, Platinum cardholders can purchase a day pass for $50 to enter the Sky Club. They also have the ability to bring in up to two guests for a $50 fee each.

 

a person holding a Delta SkyMiles platinum American express card

 

Additionally, the card currently provides an MQD waiver for spending $25,000 on your card in a calendar year for Silver, Gold, and Platinum status. You can also get an MQD waiver for Diamond status by spending $250,000 in a calendar year.

Next year, that waiver goes away and all spending you do on your Platinum card will earn 1 MQD for every $20 you spend. So spending $100,000 on your Platinum card in a calendar year would only net you 5,000 MQDs … brutal.

 

SkyMiles Reserve Cardholders Will Have Restricted Sky Club Access in 2025

SkyMiles Reserve cardholders didn't escape the bad news either.

Starting on February 1, 2025, cardholders will be capped at 10 Sky Club visits per Medallion year (Feb. 1 to Jan. 31). The same goes for Delta SkyMiles Reserve business cardholders. Currently, Reserve cardholders get unlimited Sky Club access.

 

a person holding the delta reserve card

 

Like the Platinum card, the Reserve card also provides an MQD waiver for spending $25,000 on your card in a calendar year for Silver, Gold, and Platinum status. You can also get an MQD waiver for Diamond status by spending $250,000 in a calendar year.

Next year, that waiver goes away and all spending you do on your Reserve card will earn 1 MQD for every $10 you spend. So spending $100,000 on your Reserve card in a calendar year would only net you 10,000 MQDs – not even enough for Gold Medallion under the new status thresholds.

Read more: Delta to Restrict Sky Club Access for Credit Cardholders

 

Amex Platinum Cardholders Will Have Restricted Sky Club Access in 2025

Like the Delta Reserve card, if you have The Amex Platinum Card, your Sky Club access is taking a hit in 2025.

Currently, just for holding the card you get unlimited complimentary Delta Sky Club access. Starting in 2025, each cardholder will only be allowed six Sky Club visits each year.

 

amex platinum new credits

 

Bottom Line

Delta is making big changes to its Medallion status program and how you can access the Delta Sky Club starting next year.

There's a lot to unpack, but if you're chasing Delta status, or want access to the Delta Sky Club, this won't be welcome news.

 

Editorial Disclaimer: Opinions expressed here are the author’s alone, not those of any bank, credit card issuer, airlines or hotel chain, and have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities.

Disclaimer: The responses below are not provided or commissioned by the bank advertiser. Responses have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by the bank advertiser. It is not the bank advertiser’s responsibility to ensure all posts and/or questions are answered.

37 Responses

  • Next month my wife and I fly to Taiwan and Japan on DeltaOne. We usually make 2 international trips a year and several domestic trips. Always on Delta. Today, I have to start asking myself “Why?”. We also usually have friends along with us and I have convinced them that Delta was worth the extra costs. I have been very, very loyal to Delta, but today Delta may have become just another way to get from point A to B. Our next trip to Europe in April 2024 is now up for grabs. It will be 3 couples in business class with somebody, probably not Delta. My wife and I have 3 Delta Amex cards — 1 Reserve and 2 Platinums. Some or all of those will be cancelled.

    • Exactly! I spend $250K a year…now they want to up it by $100K? Ridiculous. It seems like they would have an option to grandfather in if you’re a million miler or have been Diamond for X amount of years or something. I have convinced way too many friends to fly Delta and get the Reserve card. It’s literally mud in my face. I even fly Delta when the price is higher than other airlines. I to question if it’s even worth it now?

    • I just called to cancel my Amex Delta Platinum card after 23 years. The value of the Delta Amex cards has been decimated. Whoever at Amex negotiated this deal ought to be fired and his/her stock options taken away. I will continue to use my Delta Reserve card through Dec 31 2023 and then it will then be put in a drawer and not renewed in 2024. What a sad end to a great program. I’m an international resident who enjoyed the MQD waiver and now Delta has completely abandoned us. Will definitely be trying to get to Global Services status on United with all the money I won’t be spending on Delta/Sky Team.

    • Exactly . As a near 2 million miler since 2016 I will be looking to United and American to measure their appetite for my loyalty

  • There is nothing good about these changes. Those that will reach DM with $35k are already buying FC/D1. So they already get the best benefits. What this is doing to insulting us road warriors that are (were) loyal to Delta. Unless you hit PM by June 30th, there’s zero reasons to continue flying with Delta, especially since MQDs don’t rollover. I see very bad things for Delta in the near future…Ed, Dwight and Allison better update their resumes…

  • Just curious, as a Platinum Medallion, Delta Reserve Card Holder, and a Million Miler, is Delta still planning on letting me be Silver for Life, based on my Million Miler status? As for my loyalty at this point, I will certainly try for a status match on another carrier as there is no way I would ever be more than Silver or Gold going forward – I don’t to international travel, and I don’t buy first class over-priced Delta tickets.

  • Frustrating. I am a Gold Medallion/Reserver Amex customer. Sort of stuck between casual traveler and a high volume/valued traveler. So, I will be doing my planning for 2024 to figure out if keeping the card and worrying about medallion status makes sense.

    Two things really bother me. First, the problem of over saturation of the lounges will somewhat self-correct as the Covid carryover runs its course. Second, the move is so significant that customers like me (I have 5 trips planned for 2024 and likely will add 2 more, but that is about it) have become so devalued that my current high level of loyalty will probably transform into best flight/cost (not including the deep discount airlines).

    The premium CITI card with United confers a nice suite of benefits and is less expensive than my reserve card. And I get the one-time signup bonus so that is what my math is telling me to do.

    As a marketing executive who has been with Republic to Northwest to Delta loyalty programs since the early 80’s, I feel taken for granted. My brand loyalty has always depended upon the benefits I receive and now the relative incentive has become very small. There is a vast number of ‘stuck in the middle’ consumers who may make new choices. Not sure they accurately gauged the level of frustration/resentment/anger being expressed by their customers that we read about in the comments of these articles.

    • I totally agree. I’m in the same boat you are . I’ve been so loyal to Delta and now don’t really see a way to ever earning my gold stays, let alone Platinum! Very disappointed with Delta.

      • Why would anyone ever want to get a delta reserve card? Seriously there is no benefit for the cost just get an Amex plat and pay for lounge acccess above the limit.

  • I wish if they were going to limit visits they would at least allow a guest to use the visits as well. I have the Amex Platinum and probably won’t use all 6 visits but I still don’t like the devaluation on a high fee card especially considering they just raised the fee last year. I would be less likely to downgrade if they allowed 6 uses including a guest. That would seem to be a fair compromise to get some value back.

  • If I convert my 380,000 roll over miles to Sky Miles, will they count towards Million Miler status or do they just go into my account. I’m a little over 100k from 4 million miles and lifetime Platinum. Thanks

    • I heard they’re getting rid of the 1 million, 2 million etc flyer program. Did anyone else hear this? Also, if we covert roll over miles to skymiles, will they count towards million miler status?

  • Loyalty works both ways.
    I’ll be flying other airlines, cancelling my Amex Reserve and Platinum cards, and taking my business elsewhere.

    • I just called to cancel my Platinum card. It was either that or pay the $250 annual fee which is definitely not worth it. Will cancel Reserve next July when it is up. Amex use is not worth it to get status.

  • Thank you for your article. Details tremendous!

    Ok Delta, I hear a mass exodes of loyal Delta customers that will leave and never come back. I count myself in the numbers. I was there flying Delta during Covid, delt with the restrictions and the lines at Sky Clubs understanding this is current situation and it will change. A few years ago you impacted your Skymiles program with upping the requirements and now this terrible roll out?? Sorry AE, will not renew memberships next year. Hello United and American Airlines, who want’s a loyal customer??

  • My entire department has been loyal to Delta, and we pretty much fly weekly for our company. I hit Diamond fairly consistently on MQM and barely on MQD right now, there is simply no way I will ever hit Diamond under the new plan, even though I will routinely do 130K+ actual butt-in-the-seat miles on Delta. This is a slap in the face for anyone who travels routinely for business and isn’t upper management or a C-level executive.

  • Clearly they need to increase the effective price of SkyClub access. That part seems fine. If you don’t want to spend $75k on the Reserve, just cancel it and buy a proper membership.

    But I don’t understand why they’d make it so hard to get Silver and Gold. These statuses cost DL nearly nothing but bring incremental revenue by tricking people into not price shopping.

  • This is a mixed bag and mostly bad. The only upside I see is that with less people achieving gold and platinum there may be more upgrades for silver and gold. When I first joined sky miles I was regularly upgraded in silver and always with gold. Now with diamond I rarely get upgraded.

    The rollover MQMs created this problem. So Delta is restructuring and hopefully it’s gets back to before. Because as it currently stands only Platinum gets you anything especially if you live in a Delta hub

    The Sky Club access is a what infuriates me. The Delta Reserve Card is the ultimate bait and switch. For $550 a year I get 10 visits? Unacceptable! Sure I get miles. Sure I get unlimited access for $75k but it requires 100% loyalty to DELTA and the AMEX card. Maybe that’s the point.

    But with the delta Amex you lose some traditional Amex perks and I’m not sure it’s worth it.

    My Chase Sapphire gives me money back, spending perks and flexibility. I need to decide which one is my prime card.

    And lastly, over crowding in the Sky Club can be managed. Limit guests. Get rid of passes. Don’t allow access 3 hours early unless on a layover.

    And I have been turned away a few times despite my status. It happens.
    Sometimes the airport is crazy busy.

    They seem to have taken the east way out rather than manage the problem better.

    Delta Reserve AMEX people are the most loyal and they deserve the perks

  • Is AA doing a status match challenge? I fly 300k MQMs to date and will struggle to hut the new spend threshold. I fly every other week and curious how AA vs Delta compare.

  • Well Delta certainly has my attention as does AMEX. I fly mostly for business and mostly on Delta. I have enjoyed the partnership with AMEX and Delta since the 90’s. I now see how loyalty is treated. Delta has decided this is the best option for them, selling it as some sort of favor to the rest of us. Business is business and I shall take my cue from Delta and make changes that benefit me and my business.

  • Delta just went from my number one airline to my last choice going forward. I’m a 2.5 million miller, and now actually flying means nothing. Very sad and the backfire will be huge, and those fancy new lounges will be empty.

  • I started a new job in 2019. In 2020, during the pandemic, I started flying a lot. First I was sharing with United and American. Then American stranded me in NYC and could not find a way to get me home for three days. Delta became my choice as it could get me where I needed to be and back in the same day. I was flying weekly. I fly from Cleveland to Chicago via Detroit out of loyalty! I have the AMEX business platinum card so I get into the lounges whenever I want. I know that I save money every year just by not having to pay for $20 hamburgers!
    Well, these changes will make me rethink everything. I will probably try to find a status match that makes sense. As for the club access – 6 visits a year! I have left Cleveland at 5 AM before and eaten breakfast in a SkyClub in MSP or DTW waiting for a connection to MKE. Finished my job in MKE and gone back to the SkyClub there for a late lunch. Then had a drink in DTW waiting for my flight back to CLE. So, in two or three weeks I would use all six of my visits. Nope, not worth it anymore!

  • I’m loyal to Delta but only fly about 6 roundtrips a year but a couple are usually longer hauls (Overseas, Hawaii). I routinely earn Platinum Status through spend with the Delta Reserve AMEX. I don’t often have much for MQDs though. I’m probably the problem in Delta’s eyes. I’ve enjoyed the C+ upgrades and other benefits Platinum brings but this will be the end for me. In some ways, maybe it’s a relief. In some ways I chase the status because it has a value. So I pay a little more for a Delta ticket, I use my Reserve card for EVERYTHING I can, but why now? There’s no way I’m going to achieve Platinum anymore. NO WAY. So this is it. Why be loyal, even for the half dozen flights? Why have the Reserve? I’ll be re-evaluating it all.

    In some regards, I get the “if we all have status, nobody has status” but dang. How many people will achieve status of Platinum or Diamond anymore? It seems like too much of a stretch. I see it cutting into business for Delta and AMEX. Sure, there were too many people that had Delta Medallion status due to COVID rollovers but that’s fixing itself now. What I’ve noticed though this year is less packed lounges with last years rule changes, increased price, and rollover burnout. I’ve also noticed it’s darn near impossible for an upgrade from C+. The other day I was #25 of 52 for the 2 first class seats. So yes, many people are eligible for upgrades and many, many people have Medallion status. There’s no reason I see working to be anything but Platinum or higher with Delta. My guess is 90% of us won’t get there anymore. So where are we going…..???

  • There was a revolt last time they made club changes and they went back as they sensed a brand revolt. I might suggest for all of us that choose the cancel AMX cards with delta cut them in half after you cancel and send to customer service at Delta. Once I leave I will not be back. In Seattle they got rid of the Diamond checkin line counter and I have waited for over an hour as it’s now the Priority line. A lot of signs of detrimental consumer decisions

  • Now it is April 2024. There is no clear monthly status update that is understandable. No way to see your MQD that you have earned, including those Am Ex “boosts”.

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