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Chase Ink Business Cards Breakdown: Preferred, Cash and Unlimited

Chase Ink Business Cards

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We’ve written at length about how valuable Chase points are, and focused largely on great personal cards like the Chase Sapphire Preferred and Chase Sapphire Reserve.

However, there’s a powerful trio of Chase business cards that shouldn’t be ignored. The Chase Ink Business Preferred Credit Card, Chase Ink Business Cash Credit Card, and the Chase Ink Business Unlimited Credit Card are all worth a  look.

Remember: You don’t need a huge business to apply and qualify for one of these cards. A sole proprietorship, selling goods online on the side, is generally enough to get the OK for any of the Chase Ink Business cards.

And given the growing options for business credit cards out there, this is a great way to accelerate your travel rewards. Here’s a rundown of all three cards.

 

Chase Ink Business Preferred Credit Card

If the Chase Sapphire Reserve is the top travel rewards card – and we think it is – then the Chase Ink Business Preferred might just be the top business travel rewards card.

The Ink Business Preferred card mixes a great welcome bonus, solid ongoing spend return, and strong travel benefits. Here are the basics on the Ink Business Preferred card:

 

Chase Ink Business Cards

 

  • 80,000 Chase Ultimate Rewards points after spending $5,000 in three months
  • $95 annual fee which is not waived for the first year
  • 3x points on all travel; shipping costs; Plastiq bill payments, internet, phone, and cable service; and advertising purchases through social media or search engines on your first $150,000 of spending each year. 
  • 1x points on all other purchases
  • Each point is worth 1.25 cents when booking travel through the Chase Ultimate Rewards Portal
  • The card does not charge Foreign Transaction Fees
  • $600 in cell phone damage or theft protection (with $100 deductible)
  • Up to $10,000 in trip cancellation or interruption insurance
  • Primary rental car collision and damage waiver coverage
  • Trip  ($500) and baggage delay ($100) reimbursement
  • Lost luggage insurance of up to $3,000 per person per trip

Click Here to learn more about this card and other travel rewards credit cards.

 

Chase Ink Business Cash Credit Card

Next up is the Chase  Ink Business Cash card. And though its signup bonus isn’t quite as big as the Chase Ink Business Preferred card, it shouldn’t be ignored.

While this card is marketed as a cashback card rather than a points-earning card, it’s simple to accumulate. So long as you already have a card that earns Ultimate Rewards points (including personal credit cards like the Sapphire cards mentioned above), you can transfer the “points” over from your Ink Business Cash Card.

That means you can then use the $500 cashback bonus as 50,000 points, transferring to an airline partner or booking directly through the Chase travel portalHere’s the skinny on the Chase Ink Business Cash card:

 

Chase Ink Business Cards

 

  • 50,000 points or $500 cash back after spending $3,000 in the first three months of card membership
  • The card has No annual fee
  • 5x points on internet, cable and phone service; office supply purchases on your first $25,000 of spending each year. 
  • 2x points on restaurants and gas stations on your first $25,000 of spending each year.
  • 1x points on all other eligible spending
  • 0% introductory APR on balances and balance transfers for 12 months
  • Primary rental car collision and damage waiver coverage
  • Lost luggage insurance of up to $3,000 per person per trip

Click Here to learn more about this card and other travel rewards credit cards.

 

Chase Ink Business Unlimited Credit Card

This is Chase’s newest business credit card. And much like the card above, the Chase Ink Business Unlimited doesn’t earn points outright. But so long as you’ve already got an Ultimate Rewards-earning card in your wallet, it works. Here’s the gist of what you’ll get with the Chase Ink Business Unlimited card:

 

Chase Ink Business Cards

 

  • 50,000 points or $500 cash back after spending $3,000 in the first three months of card membership
  • The card has No Annual Fee
  • 1.5x points on all purchases
  • Primary rental car collision and damage waiver coverage
  • Lost luggage insurance of up to $3,000 per person per trip

Click Here to learn more about this card and other travel rewards credit cards.

 

So Which Card is Best? 

That’s a really difficult question to answer. Each of these cards has some serious benefits over one another. It really depends on your spending patterns. 

The Chase Ink Business Preferred’s 80,000-point bonus is tough to beat. As is the large array of expenses that qualify for 3x points. And the ability to redeem points for 1.25 cents directly is a bonus, though you can do better if you already have the Chase Sapphire Reserve. Click Here to learn more about this card and other travel rewards credit cards.

However, if you’re paying serious business expenses on internet service or office supplies, the Chase Ink Business Cash card’s 5x points on internet, cable, and phone service and at office supply stores is unbeatable. Click Here to learn more about this card and other travel rewards credit cards.

Meanwhile, the Chase Ink Business Unlimited is about as good of an all-around spending card as you’ll find. If none of the spending categories above stick out but you’ll still be racking up some expenses, this card’s 1.5x points on all purchases is stellar. Click Here to learn more about this card and other travel rewards credit cards.

 

Our Favorite Benefit

Of course, there are some important travel benefits that can stack up with each card. Many of them overlap with the big travel rewards cards like the Chase Sapphire Preferred, Chase Sapphire Reserve and more.

However, one that sticks out is the cell phone damage or theft protection on the Chase Ink Business Preferred. If your phone is damaged or stolen, you can get up to $600 per claim (after a $100 deductible). Better yet, you can file up to three claims each year.

This is a benefit that few cards carry, though it’s value to you will depend on how expensive your phone is and what your manufacturer or cell phone service provides. You simply need to pay your cell phone bill with this card in order to get the benefit.

 

Special Considerations with Chase Credit Cards

If you’ve applied for or read about Chase credit cards, you’ve likely come across the bank’s 5/24 rule. Basically, Chase won’t accept applications if you’ve opened five or more cards in the last 24 months from any bank – not just Chase.

While opening these Ink Business cards are subject to the 5/24 rule, they will not add to your card count for future applications. So if you’ve opened three or four cards in the last two years, it might be the perfect time to apply for one of these cards. That way, it won’t hinder any applications for other future Chase cards.

And there’s one other detail that makes these cards even more alluring. While Chase restricts earning bonuses on both the Chase Sapphire Preferred and Chase Sapphire Reserve, that’s not true of the Ink Business family. You can stack welcome bonuses from several of these cards, so long as you’re approved.

 

Bottom Line

Diving into the world of business credit cards can be daunting. But they aren’t reserved only for big businesses, and the ability to keep earning big Chase bonuses makes these cards worth considering. If you are already carrying one of the Chase Sapphire personal credit cards and own a small business, adding one of the Chase Ink Business cards is a no-brainer. 

 

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Editorial Note: Any opinions, analyses, reviews, or recommendations expressed in this article are those of the author’s alone, and have not been reviewed, approved, or otherwise endorsed by any card issuer.

The responses below are not provided or commissioned by the bank advertiser. Responses have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by the bank advertiser. It is not the bank advertiser’s responsibility to ensure all posts and/or questions are answered.

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