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Chase Credit Cards

How Two Chase Credit Cards Can Quickly Earn You 100K+ Points

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Just this week, Chase introduced a huge new 80,000 point sign-up bonus on the Chase Sapphire Preferred Card after spending $4,000 in the first three months. That’s the biggest bonus we’ve ever seen on the card, making the best travel credit card for beginners even better.

But that doesn’t mean the Chase Sapphire Preferred Card should be your go-to card forever. Once you’ve earned that big sign-up bonus, you’d be better off putting your grocery shopping, dining, and many other purchases on a different card.

Enter the Chase Freedom Flex and Chase Freedom Unlimited Cards. These two Chase credit cards have no annual fee and typically earn cashback. But pair one with the Chase Sapphire Preferred Card, and it forms a powerful tandem that can help you earn even more Chase Ultimate Rewards points.

We’ll walk you through why you may want to pair one of these cards alongside your Chase Sapphire Preferred Card – and how you can earn a quick 100,000 Chase Ultimate Rewards points (and then some).

Read more: 8 Great Ways to Use 80K Chase Ultimate Rewards Points.

 

Chase Freedom Flex vs. Freedom Unlimited

What’s the difference between these two Chase credit cards?

Chase introduced the Freedom Flex Card just this month as a replacement for the wildly popular Chase Freedom Card, which is getting sunsetted. At the same time, Chase updated the benefits on the Chase Freedom Unlimited to make that card even strong.

So let’s take a look at what each card offers.

 

Chase Freedom Flex
  • Welcome bonus of $200 after spending $500 within three months of opening the card.
  • Earn 5% cashback on rotating quarterly categories
  • Earn 5% cashback on groceries for the first year on up to $12,000 spent (excluding Target and Walmart)
  • Earn 5% cashback on travel booked through the Chase Ultimate Rewards portal
  • Earn 5% cashback on Lyft rides through March 2022.
  • Earn 3% cashback on dining, including takeout and delivery services
  • Earn 3% cashback at drugstores
  • Earn 1% cashback on all other spending
  • Affected By The Chase 5/24 Rule: This card is subjected to Chase’s 5/24 rule, so you won’t get approved for the Chase Freedom Flex if you’ve opened five or more credit cards (from any bank, not just Chase) in the last 24 months.
  • No Annual Fee!

 

Chase Freedom
Click Here to learn more about the Chase Freedom Flex Card. 

Chase Freedom Unlimited
  • Welcome bonus of $200 after spending $500 within three months of opening the card.
  • Earn 5% cashback on groceries for the first year on up to $12,000 spent (excluding Target and Walmart)
  • Earn 5% cashback on travel booked through the Chase Ultimate Rewards portal
  • Earn 5% cashback on Lyft rides through March 2022.
  • Earn 3% cashback on dining, including takeout and delivery services
  • Earn 3% cashback at drugstores
  • Earn 1.5% cashback on all other spending (an unlimited amount)
  • Affected By The Chase 5/24 Rule: This card is subjected to Chase’s 5/24 rule, so you won’t get approved for the Chase Freedom Flex if you’ve opened five or more credit cards (from any bank, not just Chase) in the last 24 months.
  • No Annual Fee!

 

chase freedom unlimited
Click Here to learn more about the Chase Freedom Flex Card. 
These cards clearly have a lot of overlap. They’re designed to be a mainstay in your wallet, a smart way to pay for many of your everyday expenses.

The biggest difference is that the Chase Freedom Flex earns 5% back (on up to $1,500 of spending) on a set of rotating quarterly bonus categories: Amazon and Whole Foods through the end of September, and at Walmart and on Paypal purchases from October through the end of the year. Stay up-to-date on the latest Freedom and Freedom Flex bonus categories!

Meanwhile, the Chase Freedom Unlimited earns an unlimited 1.5% cashback on all other spending. That makes it a good catch-all card for your other spending – especially if you feel you can’t max out the Chase Freedom Flex bonus categories.

One other critical difference: Unlike the Chase Freedom Unlimited Card, the new Freedom Flex card isn’t from Visa. It’s a World Elite Mastercard. That may seem like a meaningless change, but it opens up even more benefits like cell phone insurance, earning free Lyft credits, discounts on Postmates deliveries, and more. See all the World Elite Mastercard benefits.

Chase technically allows you to hold both the Freedom Unlimited and the Freedom Flex, you only need one to pair with your Chase Sapphire Preferred (or Reserve) Card.

 

Why You Should Pair a Freedom with a Sapphire Card

The one-two punch of holding a Chase Freedom card with a Chase Sapphire Preferred or Reserve credit card is undeniable.

When you’ve got a Chase Sapphire card, the cashback your Freedom card earns can be turned into Chase Ultimate Rewards points. Every cent you earn equals 1 Chase point. Earning 5% cashback could also mean 5x Chase points.

Let’s say I hold the Chase Freedom Unlimited and the Chase Sapphire Preferred. Just for spending $500 in the first three months of card membership on the Freedom Unlimited, I’ll earn a $200 cash bonus. And since I hold the Sapphire Preferred, that $200 can be turned into 20,000 Chase Ultimate Rewards points to use towards travel.

Or take it even farther: Let’s say you spend $1,000 on groceries for your first 12 months with the card. With the 5% cashback bonus on the first $12,000 spent on groceries in year one, that’s another $600 in cashback … or another 60,000 Chase points. Add in the standard sign-up bonus, and you’ve earned 80,000 points!

Both cards will earn more points (3% back or 3x points) on dining than you would earn with the Chase Sapphire Preferred card on its own. Holding one of the Freedom cards is a great way to make sure you squeeze the most value out of your everyday spending.

chase credit cards

 

And critically, you can open a Freedom card, and take advantage of this new 80,000 point offer on the Chase Sapphire Preferred Card to earn 100,000 points total after spending only $4,500 in the first three months and paying one $95 annual fee (on the Chase Sapphire Preferred Card).

Those points work out to at least $1,250 in free travel – not bad for paying just $95 in annual fees.

Chase Sapphire Preferred

 

Click Here to get more information about the Chase Sapphire Preferred Card. 

 

How to Responsibly Earn the Bonus on Chase Credit Cards

Let’s be clear about something: Spending $4,500 in only three months is no small task. If you don’t think you can do it responsibly, you shouldn’t try.

Credit cards are serious business, and debt is a major problem in this country. If you charge expenses you can’t pay off immediately, paying back high interest rates will negate the value of whatever points you earn.

But if you can meet the spending requirement responsibly, this is a fantastic strategy to earn two big Chase bonuses – and then keep earning Chase points on your everyday spending. If spending $4,500 in three months sounds like a stretch, keep in mind that there are creative ways to responsibly hit those minimum spending requirements.

Services like Plastiq allow you to pay rent (and sometimes your mortgage) and other bills on a credit card for a small fee.

 

Bottom Line

Pairing a Chase Freedom Card with a Chase Sapphire Card is powerful points-earning duo. You’ll unlock more points upfront, and maximize more of your everyday spending from thereon out.

Because of the Chase 5/24 rule, we always suggest prioritizing Chase credit cards as you work to earn points to fuel your future travels.

Editorial Disclaimer: Opinions expressed here are the author’s alone, not those of any bank, credit card issuer, airlines or hotel chain, and have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities.

Disclaimer: The responses below are not provided or commissioned by the bank advertiser. Responses have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by the bank advertiser. It is not the bank advertiser’s responsibility to ensure all posts and/or questions are answered.

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