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US Airlines Propose 19 New Flights to Tokyo Haneda Airport

Delta Plastic Straws

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It was recently announced that US airlines will have the right to 12 additional daytime slots at Tokyo Haneda Airport (HND). Japan has slowly been opening up Tokyo Haneda for international flights and the US airlines have been quick to jump on the available slots. That’s because of how much closer Tokyo Haneda is to the city than Tokyo’s other airport, Tokyo Narita (NRT).

On Thursday, American, Delta, United, and Hawaiian Airlines all filed paperwork with the US Department of Transportation requesting additional flights to Tokyo Haneda (HND).

These 12 slots would be available by the summer of 2020 if all goes to plan. Japan has committed to opening up more capacity in time for the 2020 Olympic games in Tokyo. Read on for more details on what the US airlines are requesting.

 

Delta Air Lines

Currently, Delta flies nonstop to Tokyo’s Haneda airport from both Los Angeles (LAX) and Minneapolis/St. Paul (MSP). On Thursday, Delta announced their plans to add five additional routes from the US to Haneda Airport. Delta plans to operate the flights using the following aircraft types:

  • Seattle Tacoma Airport (SEA) to Haneda (HND) – would be operated using Delta’s newest international widebody aircraft, the Airbus A330-900neo which will feature the Delta One Suites, Delta Premium Select, Delta Comfort+ and Main Cabin.
  • Detroit International Airport (DTW) to Haneda (HND) – would be operated using Delta’s flagship Airbus A350-900 aircraft which also features the new Delta One Suite.
  • Atlanta International Airport (ATL) to Haneda (HND) – would be flown using Delta’s refreshed Boeing 777-200ER, featuring Delta One Suites, the new Delta Premium Select cabin and the widest Main Cabin seats of Delta’s international fleet.
  • Portland International Airport (PDX) to Haneda (HND) – would be flown using Delta’s Airbus A330-200 aircraft, which features 34 lie-flat seats with direct aisle access in Delta One, 32 in Delta Comfort+ and 168 seats in the Main Cabin.
  • Honolulu International Airport (HNL) to Haneda (HND) – would be operated twice daily using Delta’s Boeing 767-300ER. This fleet type is currently being retrofitted with a new cabin interior and inflight entertainment system.

 

New Flights to Tokyo

Delta’s newly proposed routes to Tokyo’s Haneda (HND) Airport

 

American Airlines

Currently, American Airlines only flies nonstop to Tokyo’s Haneda Airport out of Los Angeles (LAX). On Thursday, American announced their plans to add three additional routes from the US to Haneda airport. The new proposed routes are as follows:

  • Dallas International Airport (DFW) to Haneda (HND) – would be operated on American’s Boeing 777-200ERs and the proposal includes 2x daily service.
  • Las Vegas International Airport (LAS) to Haneda (HND) – would be operated using American’s Boeing 787-8 Dreamliner and operate once daily.
  • Los Angeles International Airport (LAX) to Haneda (HND) – would be operated using American’s Boeing 787-8 Dreamliner and operate2x daily when factoring in the existing service.

 

New Flights to Tokyo

American’s newly proposed routes to Tokyo’s Haneda (HND) Airport

 

United Airlines 

Currently, United Airlines only flies nonstop to Tokyo’s Haneda Airport out of San Francisco (SFO). On Thursday, they announced their plans to add six additional routes to Tokyo Haneda (HND). The new proposed routes are as follows:

  • Chicago (ORD) to Haneda (HND) – would be operated on United’s Boeing 777-200ERs and the proposal includes 1x daily service.
  • Guam (GUM) to Haneda (HND) – would be operated on United’s Boeing 777-200ERs and the proposal includes 1x daily service.
  • Houston (IAH) to Haneda (HND) – would be operated on United’s Boeing 777-200ERs and the proposal includes 1x daily service.
  • Los Angeles (LAX) to Haneda (HND) – would be operated on United’s Boeing 787-10 Dreamliner and the proposal includes 1x daily service.
  • Newark (EWR) to Haneda (HND) – would be operated on United’s Boeing 777-200ERs and the proposal includes 1x daily service.
  • Washinton Dulles (IAD) to Haneda (HND) – would be operated on United’s Boeing 777-200ERs and the proposal includes 1x daily service.

 

New Flights to Tokyo

United’s newly proposed routes to Tokyo’s Haneda (HND) Airport

 

Hawaiian Airlines

Currently, Hawaiian Airlines flies nonstop to Tokyo’s Haneda Airport out of both Honolulu (HNL) and Kona (KOA). On Thursday, they announced their plans to add three more daily flights from Honolulu to Haneda (HND) which they would service with Airbus A330-200 aircraft.

 

Our Analysis

As we say with all new routes, more competition only bodes well for travelers as it should ultimately drive prices down into the Tokyo market. As you can see above, there are 19 new routes that have been proposed and only 12 slots available. This simply means that not all of these are going to be approved.

The US Airlines had to file applications to secure these slots by yesterday (2/21/19) and they will receive answers on approval status by Feb. 28, 2019, so we should know what routes will be added pretty quickly here.

Some of these routes haven’t been possible historically due to aircraft limitations. But thanks to advancements like the Boeing 787 Dreamliner and the Airbus A350, many US cities are now within reach of Tokyo on a nonstop flight.

These additional slots won’t be starting service until March 29, 2020, which is what Japan considers the start of their summer flying season ahead of the 2020 summer Olympic games.

 

Bottom Line

This is exciting news as more traffic to Tokyo’s Haneda Airport (HND) out of the US bodes well for travelers. More competition should lead to lower prices as the airlines battle for your business.

 

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Lead photo courtesy of Chris Lundberg via Flickr.

Editorial Note: Any opinions, analyses, reviews, or recommendations expressed in this article are those of the author’s alone, and have not been reviewed, approved, or otherwise endorsed by any card issuer.

1 Response

  1. Christopher DiGiovanni says:

    Thanks for the information. Very interesting!

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