Singapore Airlines Will Restart Nonstop Flights to LAX in November

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Singapore Airlines is launching a nonstop flight between Singapore (SIN) and Los Angeles (LAX) this fall, its second ultra-long-haul route to the U.S. with a brand new aircraft. Singapore won’t be new at LAX, as the airline already flies in and out of the airport several times daily. However, those flights involve layovers in either Tokyo-Narita (NRT) or Seoul-Incheon (ICN).

With a new Airbus A350-900ULR on the way, Singapore can fly the 8,770-mile journey uninterrupted. Flights between LAX and SIN will begin Nov. 2, according to Australian Business Traveler.

 

The Flights

This new LAX route is just the latest exciting news about an expanding U.S. presence for one of the world’s best airlines. Singapore announced earlier this year it would restart the world’s longest flight: Newark (EWR) to SIN, starting Oct. 11 and ramping up to daily service within a week. Clocking in at 9,500 miles and up to 19 hours of flight time, it will be a beast.

The flights between LAX and SIN won’t be quite as long, but will still crack the top five of the world’s longest flights. What’s more, they’ll basically replace United’s current nonstop service between the two cities. United announced earlier this year it would end those flights as of Oct. 27.

Within a week of the Nov. 2 start date, Singapore will run daily nonstop flights between the two cities. And by December, they’ll fly 10 times weekly. That will give Singapore Airlines an enormous presence at LAX. The airline hasn’t announced any plans to curtail its existing flights that stop in Japan or Korea en route to SIN.

Singapore already flies nonstop daily between San Francisco (SFO) and SIN. With more planes on the way, it will also boost those flights to 10 times weekly. Singapore previously flew these ultra-long haul routes but scrapped them in 2013, citing their high costs. But with a new fuel-efficient plane, they’re feasible again.

 

The Planes

The Airbus A350-900ULR makes these flights a reality. ULR stands for Ultra-Long Range, and that’s no joke. It’s necessary to make the grueling flights across the Pacific Ocean. The bad news for budget travelers is that these planes won’t have economy seats. Nor will they have Singapore Air’s famed first class. Instead, the newest A350s will be equipped with just 67 business class seats and 94 Premium Economy seats.

Singapore’s business class is among the best in the world, combining chic and spacious seats with the unbeatable service that makes Singapore one of the top-ranked airlines in the world. They’ll outfit these planes with the same business product on board the standard A350s that currently fly between SFO-SIN and Houston (IAH) – Manchester (MAN) currently.

Singapore’s premium economy is top-notch as well, and well worth considering if you have some cash to spare but don’t want to splurge on a business class ticket. And while it can generally be difficult to snag business class seats on a brand new plane, that’s not the case for these flights to LAX. One Mile at a Time reports Singapore has plenty of business class seats bookable with KrisFlyer miles.

Singapore charges 88,000 KrisFlyer miles for one-way in business class from the West Coast to SIN. Premium economy will cost you 65,000 miles one way.

As a reminder, Singapore KrisFlyer miles are among the easiest to accumulate in the miles and points world. That’s because you can transfer all three major bank points and Starwood Preferred Guest points (Soon to be Marriott) to your Singapore account.

 

Bottom Line

Singapore had previously made clear it would restart nonstop service between LAX and SIN, so this news is no surprise. But that doesn’t mean the news isn’t welcome. Singapore is one of the world’s best airlines, and a growing presence in the U.S. is a win.

 

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Lead Photo Credit: [email protected] via Flickr. 

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